Tag Archives: sanctions

Has no one told Russia the cold war ended?

If you have been paying attention to the news lately, or even if you haven’t, you have probably heard about plummeting oil prices worldwide. Crude oil, which reached $100 a barrel less than a year ago, has now dropped as low as roughly $45 a barrel (The Wall Street Journal, Market Data Center). Everyday Americans view this as a great thing. I mean who doesn’t like cheap gasoline at the pump. For countries whose economy largely depends on exporting oil, however, this is a very bad thing.

One nation that has been hit extremely hard by falling oil prices is Russia.

“Heavily dependent on oil exports that are priced in U.S. dollars, Russia faces mounting pressure from U.S. and European officials over the unrest in eastern Ukraine. On Saturday, U.S. and European leaders threatened new sanctions against Moscow” (Albanese, Armental, 2015).

Russia is learning that their economy may have one huge fatal flaw, if they already didn’t know. Depending too heavily on one single commodity, crude oil, opens up their economy to extreme volatility. If the value of crude oil falls significantly, which is happening currently primarily due to increased global supply, the value of their entire economy also falls significantly. This openness to extreme volatility is exactly what is crippling the Russian economy currently. This is reflected by the falling price of the Ruble, Russia’s currency. However, this is just one of the issues that Russia is facing.

“The ruble, which has been in a free fall amid slumping oil prices and geopolitical unrest in the region, was trading at about 68 rubles to the dollar Monday, compared with about 35 rubles a year ago” (Albanese, Armental, 2015).

This “geopolitical unrest” that the above quotation is referring to is the conflict in Ukraine that has been going on for some time now.

“A surge in fighting in eastern Ukraine, which killed about 30 civilians in the Kiev-controlled town of Mariupol over the weekend, prompted U.S. and European leaders to threaten new sanctions against Moscow” (Albanese, Ostroukh, Armental, 2015).

“The sanctions, which cut off Russian banks and companies from global capital markets, are widely expected to push the commodity-dependent economy into contraction for the first time since 2009” (Albanese, Ostroukh, Armental, 2015).

If the falling global price of crude oil is not enough to sink the oil dependent Russian economy, facing sanctions and being cut off from global markets should just about do it. Changes need to be made, if Russia wants to remain a global player long term. Now don’t get me wrong, Russia is still one of the world’s most powerful nations that cannot be ignored. However, it seems that all of Russia would benefit, if Putin and Medvedev took a step back and reevaluated their cold-war-esque foreign policy, and drastically restructured their economy to keep up with the changing times. No more, it seems, that a nation can rely on natural resources alone to create a prosperous economy. No more are the days that a nation can invade another nation, and not expect serious backlash from the global community.

Sources

http://online.wsj.com/mdc/public/page/mdc_commodities.html?refresh=on

http://www.wsj.com/articles/s-p-downgrades-russia-foreign-currency-rating-to-junk-1422297409?mod=WSJ_hp_LEFTWhatsNewsCollection

http://www.wsj.com/articles/fears-of-fresh-sanctions-hit-russian-ruble-1422268436