Get Zero Interest Rates Till June!

The Fed held its FOMC meeting this past Tuesday and Wednesday, January 27th to the 28th of 2015, discussing several different aspects of monetary policy to “foster maximum employment and price stability.” Lately, there has been a lot of talk about a rumored interest rate increase that is forecasted to occur sometime this year. Fortunately, the Fed has decided to leave interest rates where they are on account of the falling inflation rates throughout the US, for which they listed several reasons. They spoke on the falling oil prices, the ECB’s decision to buy over a trillion Euros worth of bonds, and the dollar’s appreciating value. Ultimately, interest rates are still expected to increase in June of this year, and many still fear this day.

A USA Today article titled “Fed likely to continue to signal mid-2015 rate hike” states “The Fed typically raises interest rates to keep inflation from spiraling too high as the economy and labor market heat up and lowers rates to spur growth. The unemployment rate has fallen from 6.7% to a near-normal 5.6% over the past year, providing support for adhering to Fed policymakers’ forecast for the first rate hike in June.” Should the Fed increase interest rates, many negative events may occur. The most likely result of this increase would be an immediate shock to the stock market. Investors like conditions where money is cheap, and higher interest rates mean it is effectively more expensive to borrow. The same goes for mortgages, loans, and credit. People would ultimately see a decrease in the purchasing power of their dollars, and a rise in prices everywhere. Historically, higher interest rates have been signs of an economic recession, however the Fed doesn’t have much of a choice.

Some expect that the Fed shall continue printing money and buying securities to keep interest rates artificially low. That is entirely within the realm of possibility, however eventually the Fed has to raise interest rates or inflation will devalue the dollar to a worthless status. It’s going to be a risky decision for the Fed, and had they raised interest rates a long time ago, it may have been a smarter move. Economic crashes have always occurred cyclically. Never for the same exact reason, always the same way. As with the 2008 subprime mortgage bubble, we are now faced with an even greater bubble that must be deflated. What remains to be seen is which needle the Fed chooses to use this time.

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